30 Comments

  1. Robert Beisiegel
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    You said it right way: low maintenance and not no maintenance. Yew, Beeche, any shrub, Ivy (small narrow, varieties) and other groundcover plants are good to replace lawn. Bergenias, Germanium and so on. Why not a knotgarden/cloudpruning . Or special grasses like miscanthus, mixed with bulbs. Nice to a wildflower madow. Only cut once with a sycthe. For pots: sempervivum, bergenias. Your frontgarden is the first impression. Look for easy plants that suits your climate and condotions.

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  2. neverlostforwords
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    Great advice! I must have missed this video when it was published. We were on vacation at the time, perhaps explaining why it escaped me. To the point: I can't do low maintenance anything, unfortunately. I love the thrill of seeing an ever-evolving garden vista and seeing new plants unfold their glory. Plants that are moved on to make way for the new are moved to my children's gardens where they (plants) happily continue their existence. As I am getting older, however, I will have to edit the various gardens, but I may let nature choose those that remain – that is, those that can manage with limited attention.

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  3. TheSmilingDodo
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    I love your videos. Please keep making them!

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  4. Leonie Harry
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    Thank you, I love your videos and inputs!!

    Reply

  5. Leonie Harry
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    You are totally right, e.g. the gravel beds need a lot of care, even if many of the professional gardeners tell us that is not the case. we also have a more natural lawn and are rewarded with many flowers, such as scented violets, daisies, and many songbirds that feel comfortable.

    Reply

  6. Carol Gearing
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    I really enjoyed watching this video, so much here extremely useful, thanks Alexander

    Reply

  7. i tuzem
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    Alexandra, thank you for this video! Very useful for my future front garden 🙂 I didn't catch the name of the pink flowers on 1:17. What are they?

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  8. Sandra Allen
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    Excellent and informative video, thank you

    Reply

  9. Marion b
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    can give advice on sandy soils and plants. I have a house near the beach and despite adding topsoil, manure, and compost I feel I'm still left with lifeless sand. I don't really like typical gardens around here as they are just beach daisy 's. Help

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  10. Feeonagh Chambers
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    What a delightful video! Came upon this completely by chance!

    Reply

  11. Barb W.
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    As a new subscriber, I'm really enjoying your videos and learning a lot. But I have a request :: is there any way you can increase the volume of your voice in your recordings? I've turned up all the volume dials I can find, and it is still difficult for me to hear what you are saying. Thank you!

    Reply

  12. Sarah Bates
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    Roses in the front beds is a brilliant idea! I have a hedge of boxwood along each side of my front walk with 24” beds in front of them, and have dotty perennials that are hard to keep up with…so low growing landscape roses may be just the thing! Thanks for the great idea.

    Reply

  13. Dominique Barrette
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    Informative thanks

    Reply

  14. Natalie Dodson
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    Thank you Alexandra another very helpful informative video. You have a beautiful front garden. Natalie 😀

    Reply

  15. Sherry Lu
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    I love trees 🌳 ❤️ and lavenders

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  16. Embracing Harvest
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    Roses and lavender are all over my front yard garden as well! Great tips!

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  17. How’s It Growing?
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    Very good info. I’ve made so many errors in over complicating with some perennials that I didn’t divide with similar issues you had. Thank you!

    Reply

  18. Ana-Maria Valerio
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    Hi Alexandra. Very nice and interesting video. Perhaps you could write a list of the names of the plants, for instance the pink bulbs or the name of the trees. I live in Spain and always looking for new plants but with the names I can find out if they work here. Thanks a lot.

    Reply

  19. karynlarkin
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    Great tips. Thanks!

    Reply

  20. Marlise Govan
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    🌸🌻🌺🦜🍂🐿SO HELPFUL ‼️

    Reply

  21. Christine Tullmann
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    Thank you for this–good tips all and your front garden is beautiful! My front garden has finally evolved to low maintenance after many years of trial & error. We are in US Zone 6 and deer browse is a huge issue. What I've edited down to are barberry, boxwood, coneflowers, daffodils, a magnolia, and a smoke bush. All untouched by the deer, easy to care for, and simply attractive.

    Reply

  22. susan brookes
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    As usual very good ….My thoughts were that a ll the advice can also be applied to a small low maintenance garden

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  23. Barbara Lindberg
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    The gardens are lovely. I particularly like the two trees at the gate.

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  24. Christine Pops
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    Your front garden is lovely! So charming how the crabapple trees frame your front door. I do like something evergreen near a front entrance for year round color. Although our winter's are not as mild so there is nothing that blooms in January or February in my zone 6 garden in Connecticut. Our Viburnums bloom in March and April here. I suppose witch hazel would bloom earlier but honestly I find the flowers a bit messy looking. 34 degrees Fahrenheit here today and windy (1.1 degrees Celsius!) Am dreaming of spring!

    Reply

  25. The Impatient Gardener
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    Great tips and, as usual, great visual inspiration.

    Reply

  26. Simon White
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    Hi, regarding your comments about plastic grass-as gardeners we should NEVER see any virtue in it's usage within the garden environment. I personally regard the stuff as the devils work, it effectively dead-zones any area of earth over which it is used. In reality it ought to be banned as a product and should never be promoted as an option for use in any way! I do appreciate that you don't use the stuff, and I would imagine nor would you ever consider doing so. Nevertheless, your suggesting it as an option to your subscribers is very concerning to me and many others. In a time of environmental meltdown and species collapse plastic lawn coverage is the last thing we need! It is a no-brainer! Warm regards and thankyou for your charming videos. 🙂

    Reply

  27. poples
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    I've always loved ivy, and said if I moved to britain I'd love a brick house with ivy growing up it, and was devastated when someone said that ivy destroys the brickwork. It's great to know that's not true (unless the brickwork is already damaged). And the same with trees. So fascinating, really.

    Reply

  28. KseniaIz
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    Alexandra, as always, a great video. I totally agree with you that we tend to neglect our front garden. Low maintenance front garden is the best solution. Thank you for your video. I always enjoy watching them.

    Reply

  29. Sandra Kaye Hansen
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    To me, one of the lowest maintenance varieties of plants that gives immense bang for your buck or pound is the hibiscus rose or Rose of Sharon. They bloom later in the year and look very dead when not in bloom, but, if in full sun, they'll light up your garden with hundreds of beautiful flowers that can have many shade of color. They are well worth the price and need very little care every few years or so. They're bloom time is quite long, but varies by species. Need to concentrate on limiting my front garden plant choices. I'm up to 4 already not counting my bulbs!

    Reply

  30. Chris Littebrant
    March 25, 2020 @ 6:07 pm

    Positively Lovely 🥰 Thank you for sharing, Chris-Raleigh NC

    Reply

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