28 Comments

  1. Alyssa Younan
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    My neighbour has a black walnut and it's very close to our vegetable garden. And I can attest to the tomato, peppers and eggplant issue and possible even issues with grapes, pumpkins but I certainly didn't notice an issue with all the provites that we had to dig out. 😆🥵 Though maybe BC they had been there for so long. Thanks for this random video. It's an interesting topic specially when looking at vegetables. I'll have to check out a vegetable loving list BC it's so close to ours. Thanks again!

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  2. Alexandra Gatzimos Reed
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    We cut down our walnut not only because I was afraid of the toxicity but it was the most annoying tree in our backyard. It not only would shed its leaves but the walnuts and then the stems that hold the walnuts. It was a triple threat. Not to mention that the walnuts were like bombs when they fall. And then the walnuts would attract squirrels and eventually sprout more walnut trees if not picked up by hand. You can't mow over them because then they'd shoot out like a pistol. I hate black walnuts

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  3. Bee Bop
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    I didn’t think I had a care in the world until….I found a black walnut fruit between my pines (where I want to plant hydrangeas). Apparently a house up the hill, across the street from my back yard has a blasted black walnut tree.😖

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  4. Maria Gieske
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    Interestingly I never noticed that plants didn’t grow under black walnut trees – other than the shade issue and that he nut hulls if you don’t clean them up (and I don’t) will wreck havoc on grass – I always put that down to them being big and taking up space. Like if I threw rocks. Or golf balls all over the lawn. I do happen to have a rhododendron that I planted in the woods under a black walnut. And it’s still alive. It’s only struggles are honeysuckle and greenbriers. Which grow there. O problem as well

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  5. Alvin Howell
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    The only thing I can add that is when the walnuts drop if you let the aggravating green balls stay in the grass to the point they start to decay it will kill the grass. I have tttf grass and doesn’t like it at all so I have to go out every fall and pick them all up not fun at all

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  6. gilma soler
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    Us 🤭🥴

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  7. gilma soler
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    Laura your videos are amazing. It will be an amazing video if you do one talking about fruit trees or just trees that grow big that we cant plan in containers. For as that don’t have that much of space. Can a black walnut be planted in a container?

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  8. donaleen Kohn
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    How do you rejuvenate a huechera that has grown an ugly stem? I've read you can cut them to the ground but I am afraid. Please help.

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  9. itskathyslife
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    You mentioned sunflowers having toxicity- I am wanting fro do a small cottage garden and in some of the background I planned on doing sunflowers. What should I avoid as plants to do around them! Thanks in advance – seed starting just beginning!!!🥰🌻🌸🌺🌿

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  10. Donna Bauer
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    What about planting under a maple tree? Would this apply also?

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  11. Judy Black
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    I put raised beds in the only sunny area in my small back yard. Planted tomatoes, peppers, blueberries, raspberries, asparagus. Tried to get something to grow for several years but they always died. Put in 12 rosebushes. Died. Called a guy to take down the three dead pines along the back and he pointed out the black walnut on my neighbors property. I 'd been gardening for years thought I had lost my green thumb! Unfortunately the black walnut keeps getting larger and as it grows the canopy is bigger, the roots more extensive and more of my yard is effected. Now that I am aware I plant carefully. I had a huge beautiful oak leaf hydrangea but as the walnut grows it has declined as the roots must be encroaching on it. There are plenty of plants that are not effected– iris, gladiolus, zinnias, forsythia, squash, pumpkin, echinacea, hosta, , Virginia creeper, lily of the valley, jack in the pulpit, ferns, rudbeckia,

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  12. Whispers In the Wind
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    this is so very odd, as last night I actually watched videos about black walnuts and the way that plants are interconnected using an internet of fungus. The way that mycelium acts like underground internet. Black wallnut spread toxic chemical thru this network to ensure that no other species tries to grow and take away from the nutrients that the tree (walnut tree) needs.It happens in sycamore, and Eucalyptus….this reduces the spread of microbes around their roots, to keep their lines pure so to speak.

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  13. Whispers In the Wind
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    My brother planted like 20 black walnut trees in his back yard and they took a while to take, but wow are they growing now

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  14. Stephanie Elliott
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    Good morning Laura. We have 3 on our property in north central Kansas. And have never had a problem with this. All my plants and garden work very well by my black walnut trees. I totally agree with you the talk about these trees have just been hyped up. I love that we can naturally feed our wildlife just watch out in the fall you might get bunked in the head lol. Have a great day!!

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  15. Erin Phelps
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    After watching your videos I feel like I have so much more knowledge to be confident with my gardening. Thank you for researching this so we can grow our gardening confidence.

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  16. Ralph Blosat
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    Juglone is the walnuts chemical used as a "birth control" method so that no other siblings grow around the existing tree.

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  17. Donna Santa Maria
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    i'm confused. several plants which were suggested for planting under black walnut trees require full sun such as the shasta daisy?

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  18. No one
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    This is great I have black walnuts and pick meats in the winter.

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  19. Linda Lee
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    We just covered this same topic in my Master Gardeners class and were told nothing will grow under or near a black walnut tree.
    Well….my neighbor has a black walnut tree right within 10 feet of my yard and I haven't experienced anything. My garden is there and my hedge row of azaleas are there. Everybody's growing just fine including the black walnut tree. 🌻💗🌻💗

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  20. amity 150
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    Pecan trees do this too. Its another good reason for making use of native varieties that are adapted to living under pecan trees!

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  21. Mother Henn
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    Thank you so much for this video. We have dozens of black walnuts on our 5 acres. I would love to compost the leaves but have been afraid to do so, so nice I use this compost in the garden.

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  22. Jerry F
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    Laura, I have been looking for a ground cover that existed between my childhood neighbors in the early 50,s, but can't find it anywhere. It was a single stem plant that grew only 6-8 inches tall in a season, 1 inch thin leaves the entire length of the stem with midspring very tinny white blooms into summer, liked full sun mid morning to late afternoon. It came up every year for most of my childhood. It looks a lot like Pennycress, but P/c branches and gets taller. Maybe it was a hybrid of days gone-by. I have even searched weeds of north east PA., etc. Best to you and yours.

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  23. Maggie Shreve
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    I have black walnuts and English walnuts. I have a quince (I believe) right under my largest black walnut and forsythia at it's drip line, and both are doing great. I do believe that blueberries struggle and will move mine this Spring. It's a very interesting topic. Thanks for sharing your research and thoughts 😄 Would like to add that both types of walnuts are super high maintenance with the constant barrage of walnuts, esp. black, and tons of leaves seasonally. But they sure are glorious trees for their shade, ease of care and sources of food and habitat!

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  24. Jerry F
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    PA LAWN GUY> Did you know that dandelion plants are the same way to limit challengers?

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  25. Emma Lavenham
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    Hi there, I I stress about a lot of things – but not black walnut toxicity. I had to remove one recently due to decay and planted in its place, witch hazels which are thriving! There is nothing better than witch hazels in winter in New England.

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  26. Terri Camp
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    Did you stand in front of a mirror and practice pronouncing all those horticultural terms? Nicely done!

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  27. Annette Moulder
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    I grew up in northern Ohio and see grasses grow fine under black walnut trees. I do think it’s how good the soul is. I never seen anyone have a problem. Most problem is the gathering of the walnuts. They stain everything.

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  28. Dulcie Fleming
    March 18, 2020 @ 5:21 pm

    In my 20's I lived in an old farmhouse that had about 30 mature(over 100 yr old) black walnut trees. We used to chase people out if our yard because they would come and steal the black walnuts. We had an agreement that we would sell nuts to a local tree nursery. One day I can home from a long weekend away and there was a tree company there just getting set up to cut them down. They said they had an order to come cut all 30 trees down. I never said they could be cut down. OMG! I called the police. It was crazy. I was never so happy to get out of the place. Those trees were the bane of my existence for a totally different reason. 🌳🌱

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