34 Comments

  1. Z Man The Bee Man
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Chlorine does kill them

    Reply

  2. Ade Bulbend
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Inspiring thank u👍👍

    Reply

  3. Hermes Liberty
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Some key useful ideas in your video here! I will try bags as I have an issue with keeping peace with my landlord whose home this is also. In the spirit of this video I get containers at thrift shops, grocery stores and ads annoucning 'plese take this stuff away'

    Have any DIY very small scale gardeners here found good value humus suitable for outdoor herbs in Canada? Context: I do only container gardening and there is only 5-6 hours of sunlight here. Oh, and it's the rainy coast. Once a bear seeking food smashed through the fence and smashed out again. That has nothing to do with anything except I like the story.,

    I don't see much of a point in buying premixed potting soil — for culinary and aromatic herbs anyway. I ran out of perlite and top soil so for convenience I bought at Walmart a 18 L bag of Schultz 'Premium Potting Soil Plus' for CAD $8 at Walmart. I figured it would have thre advantages…

    1. PH assurity
    2. screened for 'lumber'
    3. no gnat eggs etc.

    I don't know how free of insect and mildew it is (Rustic Garden gave me the great idea f sterilzing by boiling before use), or what the PH is (not that I really care, but hey I figure I'm paying for measurability). But the major disappointment was LUMBER. My grandfather used to set up a wooden screen made of 1 cm mesh when he screened his public land soil, but I thought buying a product for sale and in bags I could skip this step. No. I found ten pieces of sticks, the largest of which was 1.5 cm X6.5 cm. Plus dozens of finer roots — that I can accept.

    I am going to go back to buying manure, sea soil, perlite, sand etc and mix my own. But I will do one container of this Schultz soil and the 'same' plant of another soil mix pot to see if the claimed 0.08-0.12-0.08 mix of sphagnum peat moss and perlite has any advantages.

    What I am finding to be a challenge, here in the Vancouver, CA area anyway, is getting top quality humus. Or any at all. 'Everybody' sells fancy mixes but not even big gardening stores like Art Knapps or Gardenworks sell pure top soil. Isn't that what humus is supposed to be? I don't want to be for peat moss – that is the cheapest ingredient.

    I bought by the bag from the yard bulk 'top soil' but oddly the yard stuff had less lumber than the packaged (Vigoro Organic Garden Soil 0.08-0.05-0.08 from Art Knapps 28.3L for $6 CAD with tax)! If I want mulch, I'll buy mulch. I prefer measurability and customization of garden soil. The commercial bags don't tell you the percentages, so they remain a mystery.

    Naturally, I would prefer to have my own very local compost, but aside from bokashi (some investment) I am not permitted to have one here in this patio-lucky condo.

    Reply

  4. rmstreeter
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Hello, When you use grow bags, how do you contain or limit the draining water from the bottom of the container? Thanks.

    Reply

  5. Andrew Sawa
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    I notice you have both hard containers and bags for growing in containers. Which is better and why?

    Reply

  6. Two Turtle Gardens
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Great ideas for people in apartments or small yards. Even though I have a good yard I am growing in containers anyways. Easier to conrol elements.

    Reply

  7. green india gardening
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    buitiful

    Reply

  8. Sherry Braz
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    hi there. have a question for u. i took fresh grass clippings filled a 5 gallon bucket added water. im trying to do the compost tea thing. how many days to steep do u think. i figure a ratio of 6 to 1 to pour on a trial area. would this be too strong or is the grass clippings too fresh. experimenting but would appreciate some advice on this before i pour it on anything. thanks

    Reply

  9. Ravi kumar
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Got tip .. Thanks

    Reply

  10. Cherokee M
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Just subbed!!!!! I'm trying to find out how much room/size containers I'll need for the root systems. I transferred all my plants into bigger containers & each plant is in its own pot. I'm hoping since I've used bigger pots that I won't have to transfer them again… I'm just not sure how much root space all around each plant needs. I've planted strawberries ever bearing & I'm planning on eventually putting them into the yard because otherwise I'd have to bring them inside once fall comes r? or do they go dormant thru winter outside & come back? I also have Watermelons & tomatoes, peppers, snap beans, Brussels, & pumpkins & cucumbers lol I'm in NJ I have a HUGE YARD/Woods/acres but I have a bad back & the animals steal/eat my veggies/berries lol so this yr I decided on using the deck instead because it's completely closed in & High up in the air. now I'll have to watch 4 the birds & squirrels trying to steal my strawberries I think!!!!!! Thank you!!!!!🤗🤗🤗🤗💚💛💜💝❤💙

    Reply

  11. Onefaithinjesus Cross
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    where do u get the big green bags

    Reply

  12. rain coast
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Where did you get that big grey tub from? thanks for your insight.

    Reply

  13. dev bachu
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    great I gonna try the. containers for my celery an parsley etc i love garden bro

    Reply

  14. Cls
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Good variety of useful tips. Have u done a video on performance growing in grow bag vs a plastic container of equal size ? I've heard ppl having fantastic results that outperform plastic containers while another person i recently watched said it was too much hassle with watering as it evaporated too quick. Grow bags might do well as the bottom half is usually not tapered like hard plastic containers allowing more root growth.

    Reply

  15. Hemmaodlat
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    What kind of soiless mix are you using? Is it enriched with something?

    Reply

  16. Glenda's Simple Life PH
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Hi new subscriber here, I love this video, I have started my own organic garden a week ago and I am very excited with the project. Please visit my channel (and subscribe, if you like) Thanks

    Reply

  17. ohhowhappygardener
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Where did you purchase your grow bags? The local big box store doesn't sell them as large as yours. The SIP's (self irrigating planters) you have are an interesting concept as well. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply

  18. val treff
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    I love your channel especially your control testing. I have been contemplating the reusable shopping bag method and air pruning but really not convinced about polymers? leaching into the plants since they decompose fairly rapidly. Have you done testing for that?

    Reply

  19. Antonio Pachowko
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Why aren't you growing potatoes in grow bags as this is the way forward.  Another thing you can do with pots is use saucers with them, as this will be used up when it gets warm (and recommended for plants which prefer  under water).    It is amazing what you can grow in containers and  a book I use is called " Vegetable, Fruit and Herb Growing in small Spaces" by John Harrison.   He recommends  Aubergines (Eggplants), Dwarf French (Green) Beans,  Beetroot,  Carrots, Courgettes (zucchini),  Cucumbers, Chilli,  Leeks (in large troughs), Lettuce and salad leaves, Spring onions (scallions), Parsnips (in large containers), Peas, Sweet peppers, potatoes, Radish, Swiss chard, Tomatoes, and Turnips.

    Fruit you can grow in containers are apples (minarette style), Pears, Cherry, Plums, damson, gages, figs, lemons, limes  and Oranges, Strawberries, blueberries and bilberry, cranberries, lingonberries, compact blackcurrants, redcurrants and white currants, gooseberry. goji berry and grapes.

    Reply

  20. Growing with Joe
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Great ideas for container gardening. I like hearing about renters that create "growing solutions", rather than excuses. Container gardening is an ideal option for renters. I'm looking forward to the chlorine episode.

    Reply

  21. scott
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    What type of tomato did you plant when you were talking about planting them in the back? It looked like a tight space.

    Reply

  22. How to Grow a Garden with Scarlett Damen
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Hi Steve, great tip about the mint. It is true that if left to its own devices mint will definitely take over the garden in no time. However if you can keep it under control mini is good companion plant to cabbage and tomatoes, improving both the taste and health of these plants. Mint also deters aphid, the white cabbage fly and the black tea beetle and in large quantities rats and mice. (but not rabbits – my long eared snuggly friends love to eat as much mint as they can sink their little teeth into.)
    Happy Gardening,
    Scarlett

    Reply

  23. Pople BackyardFarm
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    thumbs up 🙂

    Reply

  24. Elyse Joseph
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Really nice Stephen! I put my fig tree in my unheated garage in winter and it does great…unless somebody forgets to close the garage door at -30 😀

    Reply

  25. Foodie Laura
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    The wicking bed is a great idea, you break everything down in a really nice informative way.

    Reply

  26. Shinintendo
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Oh nice subject for next time 🙂 I was wondering about it myself, does chlorine kills beneficent bacteria, and if so is there a percentage it's safe to use… and how long do I need to leave the water outside to let it evaporate.

    Reply

  27. The Abled Gardener
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Nice video Stephan, I saw your fig trees and wondered if you have ever started fig trees from cuttings? I have them in a glass of water at the moment. Anyway, I love all your planters and how nice to have self watering ones. Take care and happy gardening, Kim

    Reply

  28. tolga erok
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Good video. I used fabric shopping bags for my capsicums and the results were amazing.

    I strongly recommend using some sort of self watering mechanism for the containers as they definitely dry out FAST. I found larry halls self watering rain gutter system performed exceptionally well.

    Keep us updated on your chlorine research

    Reply

  29. Rob Bob's Aquaponics & Backyard Farm
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Nice looking potted garden Stephen.. Do you treat rosemary as an annual there or is it one that over winters OK ?

    Reply

  30. TheItalian Garden
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    i really need to make a few wicking containers for tomatoes. they are very hard to keep watered some times during the hot seasons which extends here from late may to late august.

    Reply

  31. KALSINFILMS
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Hi Steven,

    I am so mesmerized by you I can't stop watching and criticizing you.

    OMG why are you hiding behind 3 planters while making a video. Next time you can try placing a speaker on the screen and phone it in for god's sake.

    Ah by the way I learned a lot from this video. Thanks for that. Otherwise you are just plain pain.

    I can't wait to watch your next video and find 30 things I hate about you while learning a few new things.

    I can't quit you you damn Canadian. What are these feelings I am having. God, Jesus, Allah, Moses, Buddha and Tom Cruise Please help me.

    Make a video about compost as mulch please.

    Adios. 

    Your conflicted Viewer from Los Angeles CA.

    Reply

  32. Natural Living Designs
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Great info Stephen! I look forward to you next video on "Does chlorine in the water kill the beneficial microbes in the soil?"   I would imagine chlorine is terrible for a garden..that is why I have NEVER used city water on any of my veggies. One thing is for sure you will scientifically break it down for me!(-:

    Reply

  33. Ronnie & Minh
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    We have 3 acres to grow in and we still grow lots of food in containers. Container growing is awesome.

    Reply

  34. TheNoviceGardener
    January 8, 2020 @ 7:34 pm

    Hi Steven will the honeyberries do well in containers?

    Reply

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